Summer 2014

Volume II, Issue 3, Summer 2014

Delphi visits Washington, DC once more this summer to interview two notable anchors of the DC literary scene, poet Gregory Luce, and memoirist and publisher Andrew Gifford of the intriguingly-named small press Santa Fe Writers Project (SFWP).  As in our last issue, both richly varied and textured conversations are presented as feature interviews. This issue also features a new first, where an interviewed writer returns to present a writer whose work she knows, a model Delphi hopes to build on for future issues. Special thanks to Naomi Thiers for inaugurating the Interview Connector!

Poet Gregory Luce talks to poet Naomi Thiers (whose new book of poetry In Yolo County was featured in our Winter 2014 issue) about recurrent themes and interests in his work, his focus on revealing “inscape” as Hopkins speaks about, and finding unexpected beauty among the mundane.  In a book-end interview to last season’s focus on Rose Solari’s Alan Squire Publishing, publisher Andrew Gifford speaks to Delphi’s solo editor this season, Ramola D, about the joys and travails of starting a literary press, the tremendous achievements of SFWP over the years, the writers SFWP publishes and the great possibilities for expanding the literary landscape toward new and more experimental work that small-press publishing increasingly offers. Additionally, Andrew talks about his background as heir to DC’s famed Giffords’ icecream legacy and about the memoir he is working on, We All Scream.

We hope you enjoy the issue!

Andrew-6Born and raised in Washington, DC, Andrew Gifford is the founder and director of the Santa Fe Writers Project (www.sfwp.com). Over the years, to (in his words) fuel his crippling publishing habit, he’s worked as a caterer, a bookseller, a groundskeeper, in call centers, as the wire editor for an Associated Press company, as a business writer for Oxford Intelligence, and as a development editor for the American Psychological Association books department. He is currently working on completing his own memoir highlighting his experiences as heir to the Gifford icecream legacy, We All Scream.

Gregory Luce-4

Gregory Luce was born in Dallas and raised in Texas, Kentucky, and Oklahoma. He has lived in Washington, DC,  since 1980, working for most of those years as a production specialist at National Geographic. His poems have been published widely and he is the author of 3 books of poetry: Signs of Small Grace (Pudding House, 2010), Drinking Weather (Finishing Line Press, 2011), and Memory and Desire (Sweatshoppe, 2013). In May, he won the 2104 Larry Neal Writers’ Award in poetry for a DC-based writer—which seems fitting, as his poems often reflect the day-to-day of living in DC. He is interviewed by his friend and fellow poet Naomi Thiers.

 JOIN US!

As Delphi marks the summer of 2014, our second year, with this our seventh issue, we invite writers, poets, playwrights, and filmmakers everywhere to join us–interview a fellow/sister writer or filmmaker, offer us insights into your writing residencies, centers, and workshops! If you have been interviewed in these pages, we invite you to join the Interview Connector, to follow up with an interview of your own, to introduce a writer you know to a larger audience.  Please drop in at our Guidelines page, send us your thoughts. We want to hear from you!

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